What You Need To Do If You Have Asthma?

What You Need To Do If You Have Asthma

Have you or a loved one been diagnosed with the condition known as asthma? The tips you will find below will help you control these annoying symptoms.

If you have been diagnosed with asthma, you should avoid cleaning products. Cleaning products are often full of chemicals, and breathing those chemicals in can irritate your lungs. If you have the job of cleaning your house, you should safer, natural products.

Stay away from smoking, or being around any smoke, vapours or fumes. You should avoid jobs where you might be exposed to fumes and chemicals, such as factories.

When you suffer a medium-intensity attack, try and forcefully exhale all air from your lungs. Exhale hard and fast. Expel the air in your lungs with great force! Inhale three times with short breaths, and then on the fourth one take a deeper breath so your lungs are full of air but still comfortable. Then breathe out as hard as you can again.

Pay attention to what you are doing and follow a regular rhythm. In addition, it repeatedly empties your lungs of air, so that you can draw in more oxygen-rich air. It may cause you to cough or even generate sputum, but that’s fine, you goal is for your breathing to get back to normal.

Asthma Attacks

Do you know what sub-type of asthma you’re plagued with? Knowing as much as possible about your specific type of asthma will go an incredibly long way in helping you combat the day-to-day effects it has on you. For example, if your asthma is brought on by bronchitis, you should keep your rescue inhaler with you during times when you are sick. You can avoid any future crisis by knowing and figuring out patterns of the symptoms you have.

Talk to your doctor about getting a leukotriene inhibitor if you have asthma. A leukotriene inhibitor helps to prevent leukotrienes. Leukotriene, a chemical substance, can cause asthma attacks by causing inflammation. The inhibitor will prevent leukotrienes, which can decrease the amount of asthma attacks that you have.

Asthmatics should avoid being exposed to smoke, regardless if you are a smoker. Inhaling smoke from tobacco products can compromise your lung function, which then makes you more susceptible to an attack. The risk of an attack from cigarette smoke is increased as the space you are in decreases.

Quit smoking or avoid smoke if you suffer from asthma. Smoking isn’t healthy for anyone, but if you are afflicted with asthma, preventing oxygen from getting to your lungs is just begging for an attack.

It is best to use products that are unscented in the home with someone who is asthmatic. Using products with scents, like perfume, incense and air fresheners, boosts the amount of air pollution indoors and can bring on an attack. Irritating odours are also given off by new carpeting and paints. Keep the air inside your house as fresh as you can.

Keep your homes meticulously clean to reduce attack potential if there is an asthma sufferer living there, especially, the bedroom. Don’t smoke indoors, or allow any junk food in your home. Thoroughly air out your house after every cleaning, and stay away from bleach and similar harsh chemicals while cleaning indoors.

If you’re in a room that has a lot of dust in it, don’t turn on a fan. Dust blown around by fans can cause your asthma to rear up. A fan will just blow around dust without providing fresh air, so opening a window is a better option as it brings in fresh air and ventilation.

Asthmatic patients should avoid using feather pillows. Feathers may trigger asthma symptoms by irritating your lungs. It is also advisable to use hypoallergenic sheets and comforters for the same reason.

Even if you seem to be fine, see your doctor regularly for your asthma checkups. It is important to make sure your condition isn’t worsening, and your doctor may want to prescribe a different medication.

If allergies lead to constant attacks from your asthma, there has been a recent solution that is administered via injection that provides long term care! Omalizumab is an antibody medication that is used to control these allergic reaction symptoms and may be recommended by your allergist.

During cold months, you could avoid asthma attacks by constantly wearing a shawl, muffler or a scarf that covers both your mouth and nose. This will keep you from breathing cold air. Cold air can be a nuisance and breathing it has actually proven to trigger asthma attacks. This is especially true for younger children who have severe or moderate asthma.

Everyone in your family, including you, should get the flu vaccination every year. Asthma patients should try their best to avoid getting respiratory infections. Making sure to consistently wash your hands and getting the proper vaccinations are two standard precautions.

It is important to use your maintenance inhaler daily as prescribed. However, understand that most types of inhalers contain ingredients which may make your mouth more susceptible to infections. Always brush and gargle as soon as you’ve finished using your inhaler to prevent mouth infections.

When you are cleaning your home, it is always better to use a wet mop rather than sweeping your floors. An asthma attack is one possible outcome of a sweeping session that fills the air around you with allergens and dust. You can greatly reduce this by using a wet sponge, damp rag, or moist cloth instead of your old-fashioned feather duster.

If you have asthma, it might be helpful for you to buy a dehumidifier. If you lessen your humidity in the house, you will stave off dust mites that may make your asthma flare. A dehumidifying device reduces the moisture in the air.

The article you have just read contains an assortment of helpful tips that you can use to control your asthma. But of course, the advice is only useful if applied with diligence and regularity. If you stop following your good habits, your asthma symptoms will come back. The above article outlined ways in which you can protect yourself and control asthma symptoms.

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Last updated on April 13, 2017